FANDOM


"Sammy's Visit"
Season 2, episode # 21
# 34 overall in series (205 episodes)
AITF 2x21 - Sammy's Kiss
An iconic moment in TV history captured -- Sammy Davis, Jr., who left his briefcase in Archie's cab, drops by for a visit to pick it up, and, to Archie's shock, upon leaving the Bunker home, in posing for a picture taken by Munson, sarcastically plants "The Kiss" on his cheek in "Sammy's Visit" in Season 2 (ep.#21).
"All in the Family" episode
Series: All in the Family
Network/Country: CBS-TV
Air date February 19, 1972
Production code 221 (2x21)
Written by: Bill Dana
Directed by: John Rich
Guest starring: Sammy Davis, Jr.
Mike Evans
Billy Halop
Isabel Sanford
Fay DeWitt
Keri Shuttleton
IMDb logo IMDb: Sammy's Visit
Episode guide
« Previous Next »
"Edith Gets a Mink" "Edith the Judge"

List of All in the Family episodes
List of Maude episodes
List of Archie Bunker's Place episodes

Sammy's Visit is the 21st episode aired during the second season and the 34th overall episode All in the Family. The Season 2 episode first aired on CBS-TV on February 19, 1972. Directed by John Rich, the story was written by Bill Dana.


"Sammy's Visit"
Also see:
Full Credits Transcripts More Images

Synopsis

To get some extra cash, Archie has gotten a job driving a taxi for Bert Munson. Archie is in for a big surprise when one of his passengers turns out to be Sammy Davis, Jr., who inadvertently, leaves a briefcase in Archie's taxicab, and needs to visit the Bunkers to retrieve it. Archie tries to be on his best behavior but winds up being himself, but as usual, Archie's ignorance and bigotry are full force as he nervously awaits Sammy's arrival. In the moment that made the episode, as well as television history, Sammy decides to pose for a picture with Archie, but kisses him on the cheek just as Munson trips the camera's shutter.

Plot summary/about "The Kiss"

Written by comedian Bill Dana (aka Jose Jimenez), this classic episode represents the one and only time that AITF relied upon a guest star. It all begins when moonlighting cabbie Archie comes home bearing a briefcase (Actually Archie left the briefcase back with Bert Munson at the cab office, Archie had to call Munson and have him bring it to Archie's house) left in his taxi by Sammy Davis Jr. Intending to return the briefcase to the cab company in the morning, Archie is amazed when Sammy himself shows up on the Bunker doorstep.

What follows is a brilliant blend of Davis' patented charisma and Archie's bumbling, unintentional bigotry: "I know you had no choice about bein' colored, but what made you turn Jew?" The episode's final gag, the sarcastic planting of a kiss planted on Archie's cheek while Munson shoots a photo of their meeting -- which, ironically, was Carroll O'Connor's idea -- really doesn't need not be revealed here, since it has been excerpted millions of times in an infinite number of media/news circles worldwide, as well as in dozens of TV-history specials since its initial airing on CBS-TV in 1972.

Cast (in credits order)

Main cast

Recurring characters/cast

Guest stars

Trivia/Tidbits

  • Director John Rich, who won an Emmy for this episode, has claimed that "Sammy's Visit" came about because Sammy Davis Jr., who was longtime friends with Carroll O'Connor, insisted upon appearing on his favorite sitcom -- and has further claimed that Archie's "second job" as a cabdriver was added to the All in the Family lexicon so that Davis' visit to the Bunkers would be a logical plot development.
  • The famous kiss was Carroll O'Connor's idea. When originally filmed, the kiss brought on the longest restrained laughter in the history of television. However, in the final print, the laughter was cut to make room for Archie's last line.
  • Sammy Davis, Jr. guest-starred again as himself in the spin-off series "Archie Bunker's Place".
  • Norman Lear and Carroll O'Connor came up with the idea of having Sammy Davis Jr. play himself. They wanted Davis to ad lib his lines so it would seem more natural.

More External Links

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.